Posts Tagged ‘toners’

Understanding Toners, Hydrosols and Astringents

Written by Vivoderm Admin on . Posted in Products

Written by Rachelle Dupree © Dermascope Magazine

 

https://www.dermascope.com/resources/the-name-game-discovering-the-difference-between-toners-astringents-hydrosols-and-more

The Name Game: Discovering the Difference Between Toners, Astringents, Hydrosols, and More

The Name Game: Discovering the Difference Between Toners, Astringents, Hydrosols, and More

 The difference between toners and astringents, and knowing which ones work best, can be confusing, as there are a myriad of products on the market listed as toners, astringents, mists, hydrosols, floral waters, and, more recently, micellar cleansing water.

The main difference between toners and astringents is the alcohol content. Toners and astringents can both be used to improve the surface of the skin through various ingredients. Toners typically help to remove traces of oil, perspiration, or makeup from the skin, while an astringent may be alcohol- or chemically-based and is used to deep clean the skin and close pores. Herbal toners are best for clients with normal-to-sensitive skin, while standard astringents work best on oily-to-combination or acne-prone skin.

Today, there are countless varieties of formulas available; so, professionals can customize their clients’ facial experience. Spend time researching herbal and plant ingredients to understand their efficacy and best uses for client skin types. Besides herbal varieties, today’s toners can also contain a myriad of vitamins, acids, and vegetable or fruit extracts. They can be applied in both spray form and topically. Depending on the formula and use, sprays can be convenient and easy for use on-the-go, while topical versions may be best applied during home care routines.

BENEFITSres0418

Many skin care products containing acids or SPF can disrupt normal pH balance. Using a toner after daily cleansing helps restore the disrupted acid mantel quickly. In addition, many skin toners help keep moisture locked in and can be used on-the-go when there is no time to wash the face. Spritzing the face on a hot summer day or a refreshing mist after a long plane ride or workout can be very satisfying. Facial toners and astringents also remove embedded oil and dirt, creating the appearance of smaller pores. Toners can reduce or remove harmful minerals and chlorine that may be present in tap water.

 

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Due to their typically gentle formulas, which are created to soothe and tone the skin, skin toners and astringents have few side effects. Excessive alcohol base may be the main culprit for irritation and allergic reactions. Ask clients if they have any issues with herbal- or plant-based ingredients. Choosing products that are sulfate-free and paraben-free also helps prevent the skin from breaking out or drying excessively.

BEST ACTIVE INGREDIENTS, TONERS, AND ASTRINGENTS

Many of today’s toner formulas do not contain alcohol and can be calming for irritated or sensitive skin. Clients suffering from rosacea or any dermal sensitivities would do best with non-alcohol-based, herbal toners containing soothing, anti-inflammatory ingredients such as chamomile, marshmallow, aloe vera, rose, comfrey, or calendula. Look for brands with as few ingredients as possible to keep allergic reactions or redness to a minimum.

Skin toners and astringents are also ideal for clients with acne-prone or oily skin. They can be based with isopropyl alcohol or include a reduced amount of alcohol or any other natural astringent, such as witch hazel or tea tree oil. Herbal blends best suited to acne contain willow, lavender, or citrus fruit extracts to reduce oil and tighten pores, as well as soothing herbs to reduce redness and inflammation.
Antioxidants aid cell regeneration and the repair of skin tissues. Vitamin E (tocopherol), lycopene (which is found in tomatoes), green tea, resveratrol (found in berries), grape seed, and niacinamide (vitamin B3) are all excellent ingredients to look for to boost antioxidant power. They can also hydrate the skin and improve overall texture.

Vitamins A, B, C, and E help to slow the aging process and are key components in cellular regeneration. Toners containing vitamin C and citrus extracts will also help brighten and lighten skin.

Trace amounts of essential oils may be added to the best skin toner products for fragrance purposes, while others are added for their therapeutic benefits. The most common essential oils include lavender, geranium, rose, and chamomile for their antimicrobial and inflammation-reducing properties. A lesser known essential oil, helychrysum, is a super skin healer for burns and scrapes.

MISTS

While toners are generally used as an evening skin care step to deep clean skin and prepare for additional moisturizers or serums, facial mists can be used throughout the day to help keep skin hydrated and refreshed. Some facial mists contain thermal or mineral water to deliver fortifying minerals that balance pH levels and protect the skin. Moisturizing or hydrating facial mists contain a water base and additional hydrating ingredients, such as essential oils, botanical extracts, or glycerin to help lock in moisture. Facial mists are good for all skin types and can be used to set makeup and give skin a dewy look. They are perfect on-the-go and ideal for keeping in a handbag or at work.

THERMAL WATER

Sourced from deep underground springs, thermal water is steeped in skin-fortifying trace elements and minerals, like calcium and selenium (an antioxidant), and is an excellent anti-inflammatory treatment for very sensitive skin.

Fruit-based face mists are more complex than simple infused water. For mature skin, moisturizing blends of coconut milk and coconut water help feed clients’ skin with potassium and vitamin C.

In hot weather, a moisturizing face spray with botanical extracts and essential oils can soothe and refresh heat-stressed skin of all types, including oily skin. Clients should use them liberally, as needed.

Do not let a mist or spray dry completely on the face if it does not contain a moisturizing ingredient. As water dries on the skin, it evaporates and draws out trace amounts of the skin’s existing moisture. Unless they are applying moisturizer immediately afterward, inform clients that they should spritz the face, wait a few seconds, then pat off the excess.

HYDROSOLS

Hydrosols are the condensate result of steam distillation of plants or flowers produced when creating a natural essential oil. The top floating layer of essential oil is removed and the remaining 90 percent of the water is considered hydrosol.

The terms floral water, herbal water, toilet water, and aqua vitae are commonly interchanged with hydrosol, but beware: the two products can differ vastly depending on the manufacturer. A pure hydrosol is solely plant-based and food grade, meaning it is edible. Typical floral waters found in supermarkets, drug stores, or ethnic food shops may contain non-organic ingredients such as alcohol, chemically produced fragrance, or man-made food dyes. Most often they are infused with essential oils, and cannot be considered a true hydrosol. Pure hydrosols contain some of the same aromatic molecules as essential oils, but in a much lower concentration. They are typically clear and colorless and have a light, trace aroma of the original plant or flower.

Additionally, being organic, a true hydrosol does not have the extended shelf life of a formulated floral water and can turn rancid or lose its scent with time. It is always best practice to refrigerate any pure, natural skin care products and check frequently for color and scent changes.

MICELLAR CLEANSING WATER

The latest skin care trend is micellar cleansing water. A large number of skin care manufacturers have recently added this new product to their repertoire. Unlike toners or astringents, this cleansing water is made up of micelles – tiny balls of cleansing oil molecules – suspended in soft water. The concept is that micelles are attracted to dirt and oil, so they are able to draw out impurities without drying out the skin. Thus, micellar cleansing water is marketed as a face cleanser and makeup remover but is not a toner or astringent.

There are many products available on the market when it comes to moisturizing and cleansing. Professionals can better come to understand the difference between toners, mists, astringents, and hydrosols by learning about the benefits, contraindications, and ingredients of each. This knowledge will then empower professionals to make the best choices when it comes to stocking their spas and recommending products to clients.

 

Resources April2018 RachelleDupreeRachelle Dupree has over 20 years of experience in marketing, media, and communications. She earned a bachelor’s degree in communication arts and marketing and a second degree in graphic design. She studied with a Denver-based herbalist and naturopath for four years, combining her marketing knowledge with her love of natural remedies. She currently contracts as a marketing and communications director for Vivoderm Natural Skincare and various design clients.

Natural Facial Toners: An Integral Part of Daily Skincare Routine

Written by Author on . Posted in Fundamentals

Facial Toners or astringents help to remove the oil from the skin. Most are made from alcohol, water and other ingredients such as witch hazel, salicylic acid, and benzoyl peroxide. Many women have the wrong conception that it reduces the size of the skin pores. Facial toners actually get rid of the excess oil and take out the impurities that usually lead to breakouts and blemishes. Toners help in rejuvenating the skin by increasing the blood circulation and improving the skin tone. They also reduce the overall oil secretion and help prevent blackheads and whiteheads.

However, many dermatologists say that if you maintain a daily beauty routine and clean your face properly, then you may not need to use a toner. Some facial astringents may contain harsh ingredients such as alcohol, so you must look for products that are made from natural ingredients and more gentle to delicate skin. If your toner contains alcohol then you must know that it can lead to skin drying and possible flaking. So, when possible, choose alcohol-free brands that come with natural ingredients such as green tea extracts and grape seed. You can feel comfortable using these natural facial products daily because they are less abrasive. Toners with natural herbal astringents and minerals also help to purify the skin.

Tips: Do not abrasively rub it into your skin when using. If you have a delicate skin then you might use a toner mixed with rosewater or some other hydrosol. Make sure your face is completely cleansed before use. You can also choose to make your own little mix customized to your skin type. Try this one for normal skin: Blend two tablespoons of watermelon juice, one tablespoon of rosewater or witch hazel and two tablespoons of distilled water together and then dip the cotton ball into the mixture and then apply it on the face. Ahhh, refreshing!

Benefits of a Green Tea Facial Toner

Written by Vivoderm Admin on . Posted in Herbal Treatments, Natural Skincare

The advantages of green tea are countless. It is a good healthy drink and also used as a natural beauty ingredient. Green tea is extremely good for health and can have positive effects if you are suffering from any heart disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Green tea is rich is EGCG which is a very powerful anti-oxidant. So, if you include the consumption of green tea in your daily routine you will surely see a difference in your health and external beauty.

Popular Herbs Used in Skin Care and Their Benefits

Written by Author on . Posted in Uncategorized

Popular Herbs Used in Skin Care and Their Benefits: Chamomile, Aloe Vera, Lavender and Rosemary

Today skin care and cosmetics are increasingly going natural. You may have heard that herbs and oils are commonly used in skin care and cosmetics; but, you may not know why or what purpose they serve. why, and what do the do? Four very common and popular herbs that are used in the form of oil or gels are chamomile, Aloe Vera, lavender, and rosemary. All provide unique benefits for the skin and body.

The benefits of chamomile for the skin and body range from calming effects to healing. Recent and on-going research has identified chamomile’s

chamomile herb

chamomile herb

specific benefits as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-allergenic. Chamomile is most often recognized as an herbal tea; however, chamomile is present in many skin care products. Chamomile’s active ingredients extracted from the flower are essential oils and flavonoids. Essential oils help to calm and relax irritated skin. Essential oils have also been found to be beneficial to treat and sooth acne prone skin. Flavonoids – or plant metabolites- are rich in anti oxidants that help the body repair and heal damaged skin, as well as fight free radicals, which create damage to bodily cells. Chamomile has few side effects and is effective and beneficial to the skin topically or if ingested.

Aloe Vera contains numerous, minerals, vitamin, enzymes, and natural sugars that help with inflammation. Aloe Vera is commonly known for its healing properties, which explains its popular use in skin care. Aloe Vera aids in the healing of skin burns and cuts and moisturizes and softens skin. Aloe Vera is used in skin care products to help with dry sensitive skin as the plant has unique healing and soothing properties. Taken internally, Aloe Vera has been found to regulate digestion, which in turn builds healthy skin from the inside out. Aloe Vera is available as a gel, spray, lotion, juice, cream and in the form of a capsule. Aloe Vera is most commonly found in skin care gels or creams.

Lavender has many uses in skin care that include aiding skin repair, stimulating cell growth, reducing inflammation, preventing scarring and pigmentation, regulating oil production, and reducing pain. Lavender also works as antiseptic or antibacterial agent and is considered an essential oil. Due to its extensive benefits to the skin, lavender is often found in skin care formulated to treat acne prone skin.

Rosemary can be used as an essential oil just like chamomile and lavender. Rosemary and lavender are actually found in the same herbal family.

rosemary skin care

rosemary skin care

Rosemary tones the skin, helping to even out skin tone and texture, while reliving dryness. Rosemary strengthens capillaries and is good to use on aging skin. Rosemary is found in skin care cleansers, toners and creams.

There are many other herbs used in skin care and cosmetics today-most in the form of essential oils or extracts- and all can have different or positive effects on the skin and body. Herbs and oils have been used to heal for many centuries and now are being utilized for safe, natural ways to treat skin conditions and maintain a healthy complexion.

by Tiffany Oney

Lavender As A Key Ingredient in Skin Care Products

Written by Author on . Posted in Products

Our skin is the reflection of our health and vitality, physical, mental and emotional wellness. A radiant and glowing skin indicates good health, positive attitude and vibrates self-confidence. One of the best ways to take good care of your skin is to feed it natural, nourshing ingredients. Avoiding toxins and chemical-laden products will do wonders to help many skin and health issues, such as; clearing up acne-prone skin, gaining a more restful nights sleep, fewer trips to the doctor or pharmacist, gaining an overall healthier appearance and energetic body and mind.

Of the many herbal and organic ingredients we can choose for our skincare and health regimes, lavender is by far the most-well-known, frequently used and most versatile.

What is Lavender?

Lavender’s botanical name is Lavendula officinalis / angustifolia. Lavender is a member of the Labiatae Family and is a native of the Mediterranean and Middle East regions, however, lavender plantations are now widely found around the world as species hybridisation
has enabled lavender to be grown commercially outside its natural climatic range.  The grey-green foliage and purple-blue flower spike of lavender is easily identified and commonly seen in herb gardens. Its aroma originating from the essential oil contained in lavender is readily recognized, especially when the flowers or leaves are touched.

Where does Lavender come from?

The most well known lavender comes from the Mediterranean region of France. The essential oil from the ‘French lavender’, is often preferred by Aromatherapists. However, there are two main species, Lavandula latifolia (spike or sweet lavender) and L. angustifolia (English/French lavender) that are used in commerce. Today, it flourishes throughout southern Europe, Australia, and the United States.

What are the properties in Lavender?

Lavender is used in many forms. Herbalists are most likely to use lavender in the form of tea or as a herbal extract. Aromatherapist
however, will use the essential oil extracted by steam distillation from the flowers of lavender in their treatments. And newer pharmceutical and skin care usage has seen lavender explode as a key ingredient in everything from soaps to skin creams to cosmetics.

Benefits of Lavender:

This versatile essential oil is familiar not only to many herbalists and skin care experts but to many laypersons as well. If you search the kitchen or first aid kit of any serious herbalist – lavender will most likely be there in the largest quantity. Lavender is one of the best natural ingredients to help stop the pain from minor kitchen accidents such as burns from the oven/stove or knife cuts. A drop of lavender can ease the pain, and only the addition of the gel-like innards of a freshly sliced open aloe vera leaf is as good a remedy for instant relief. Combining the two is recommended, as aloe vera instantly cools a hot burn.  For sunburn pain, lavender is also recommended. Pesky mosquito or other insect bites bothering you? Try adding lavender essential oil to the problem area(s) and your skin will thank you.

Headaches may disappear when you massage a tiny amount of lavender on your temples or the nape of your neck.

Lavender and relaxation are two words that are virtually synonymous with each other. However, according to author Erich Keller in his book ‘Aromatherapy Handbook for Beauty, Hair and Skin Care’ he writes: “Lavender is an all-purpose oil for skin care. Its effect is antibacterial, pain-relieving, healing for wounds, soothing for skin diseases, deodorizing, antiseptic, fungicidal, insect-repelling, rejuvenating, and anti-inflammatory. It may be used to treat all types of skin and is effective for acne and oily hair (as it regulates sebum production), itchy skin, hand care, cracked skin, bruises, shock injuries (in ice-cold compresses), acne scars, blisters, abscesses, furuncles, warts, boils, eczema, athlete’s foot (tea tree is more effective here, however), wounds, and burns. A bath with lavender soothes and heals the skin after sunburn.”

In either case, lavender has many powerful, therapeutic applications, which include:  Depression, insomnia, migraine, hysteria, nervous tension and paralysis.

Although it is not really anti-inflammatory, lavender is often useful where there is inflammation, hence its use in burns, dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis, boils, rheumatism, wounds, ulcers, blepharitis, conjunctivitis, cystitis, diarrhoea, laryngitis, etc. Lavender is well known for its wound healing, cleansing and toning properties and removes redness and heat from the skin, making Lavender oil a suitable addition to any skin care preparation and for any skin type.

Lavender has been shown to be very useful in the relief of burns in which case it can be applied neat to the area. Research has confirmed that lavender produces calming, soothing, and sedative effects.

Using natural ingredients is crucial to making good quality natural skin care products. Not only are using natural ingredients safer to use, but they also have less negative impact on our environment.  Lavender is suitable for use in any skin type. It’s gentle, soothing and calming properties are especially indicated for use on sensitive, dry and/or irritated skin. It is also a popular ingredient in shampoos, soaps, hair conditioners and body lotions.

Lavender’s use in skin care products is far and wide. Because of its soothing, calming properties it is an ideal ingredient in cleansers and moisturizers, but is also of value in toners and masks.  In moisturizers, lavender may be combined with other ingredients such as chamomile, jojoba, calendula, avocado and others, to reinforce the calming and soothing effects of lavender.

Home Toner Recipes

Written by Author on . Posted in Products

Blueberry Toner

Make this mask the day you plan to use it, and do not store.

3 tablespoons steamed, crushed blueberries
1/2 C. sour cream or plain yogurt

Purée ingredients in a blender at low speed until well mixed and fluffy. Apply to face and neck.  Let penetrate for 15-20 minutes. Rinse off with tepid water.  If you find the mask is too runny after blending, you should refrigerate for one hour or until of the consistency you desire.

ALMOND FACIAL MILK

The herbal waters are antiseptic and toning. Grapefruit seed extract is available in health food stores, and is included in the recipe as a preservative.

· 1/2 cup rose, lavender, or distilled water

· 1 teaspoon pure vegetable glycerin

· 1/4 to 1 teaspoon cold pressed organic almond oil

· 12 drops grapefruit seed extract

Make the rose or lavender water by placing a small handful of dried organic rose petals or lavender in a pint mason jar and adding boiling water to cover. Let steep overnight, then thoroughly strain. Combine the remaining ingredients in a glass jar and shake to blend. Dab some on your fingers or a cotton ball and massage into your skin. Rinse with warm water. Keep stored in the refrigerator for no more than a month or so. Discard at the first sign of mold.

Home Toner Recipes

Written by Author on . Posted in Products

Blueberry Toner
Make this mask the day you plan to use it, and do not store.

3 tablespoons steamed, crushed blueberries
1/2 C. sour cream or plain yogurt
Purée ingredients in a blender at low speed until well mixed and fluffy. Apply to face and neck. Let penetrate for 15-20 minutes. Rinse off with tepid water. If you find the mask is too runny after blending, you should refrigerate for one hour or until of the consistency you desire.

ALMOND FACIAL MILK
The herbal waters are antiseptic and toning. Grapefruit seed extract is available in health food stores, and is included in the recipe as a preservative.
• 1/2 cup rose, lavender, or distilled water
• 1 teaspoon pure vegetable glycerin
• 1/4 to 1 teaspoon cold pressed organic almond oil
• 12 drops grapefruit seed extract
Make the rose or lavender water by placing a small handful of dried organic rose petals or lavender in a pint mason jar and adding boiling water to cover. Let steep overnight, then thoroughly strain. Combine the remaining ingredients in a glass jar and shake to blend. Dab some on your fingers or a cotton ball and massage into your skin. Rinse with warm water. Keep stored in the refrigerator for no more than a month or so. Discard at the first sign of mold.

Apple Face & Neck Gelee

Yield: Approx. 2 applications
Ingredients:
4 teaspoons hot distilled water
1 teaspoon freshly juiced apple juice
1 teaspoon aloe vera gel
4 teaspoons vegetable glycerin
1 heaping teaspoon powdered pectin

Add the glycerin to the water/juice/gel combination and stir to fully incorporate. Add the pectin while the liquid remains quite warm (if it cools, place it in the microwave or a double boiler to raise the temperature) and use a hand held electric mixer to blend, or stir vigorously to dissolve the pectin. Once the pectin has fully dissolved, a light gel will begin to form. This may take from 15 minutes to 1/2 hour. Once the gel sets, Apple Face & Neck Gelee is ready to use. Apply the gel in a layer to your clean, damp face and neck. Rest for 15 minutes. Rinse with warm water and follow with a light moisturizer if desired. Leftover product can be stored in the refrigerator for about a week. Enjoy!! The shelf life of this product is necessarily limited by the fresh apple juice. It should be used within a few days after it is made.

APPLE SKIN TONER

Intended for slightly oily skins, we’re told by our skincare team that Apple Toner is an excellent substitute for rubbing alcohol (a real no-no, as it actually stimulates the oil glands to produce more oil).
Combine 2/3 cup witch hazel,
1/3 cup of apple cider vinegar,
and several drops of Lavender Essential Oil (or essential oil of your choice).

Mix, and add to clean bottle. Shake bottle well before using, and then dampen a cotton ball or pad saturated with your toner, and swab over face. Witch hazel is a gentle astringent, apple cider vinegar will help restore your skin’s natural ph balance, and lavender soothes sensitive skin.

BASIL ACNE TONIC

Basil is known for its “soothing and toning” properties.
2 to 3 teaspoons dried basil leaves
1 C. boiling water
Steep basil leaves in water for 10 to 20 minutes. Cool, then apply to face with a white cotton ball. Keep tonic refrigerated. Recommended shelf life: 90 days.

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